blastedheath:

Ivan Choultsé (Russian, 1874-1937), View of Lake St. Moritz. Oil on canvas, 65.4 x 65 cm.

blastedheath:

Ivan Choultsé (Russian, 1874-1937), View of Lake St. Moritz. Oil on canvas, 65.4 x 65 cm.

(Source: animalsleepstories)

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club – Rifles (1,643 plays)

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club - Rifles 

(Source: goldheartedscoundrels, via generic-art)

generic-art:

Mark Kostabi

septagonstudios:

Christian Schloe
THE RIVER

septagonstudios:

Christian Schloe

THE RIVER

(via fer1972)

red-lipstick:

Belhoula Amir (Lyon, France) - 1: Alone, 2012  2: Alone (Field), 2012  3: Alone (Ice), 2012  4: Alone (Swimming Pool), 2012  5: Alone (Space), 2012  6: Alone (Snow), 2012  7: Alone (Sea), 2012      Digital Arts

(Source: behance.net)

lucadipierro:

Drawing for work in progress.

lucadipierro:

Drawing for work in progress.

1910-again:

Jacques Hérold, Fragment de Liberté 1942

1910-again:

Jacques Hérold, Fragment de Liberté 1942

(via blastedheath)

rhamphotheca:

Scientists Study “Talking” Turtles in Brazilian Amazon
via: Wildlife Conservation Society
Authors find that Giant South American river turtles have a repertoire of vocalizations for different behavioral situations, including caring for young
Turtles are well known for their longevity and protective shells, but it turns out these reptiles use sound to stick together and care for young, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations.  Scientists working in the Brazilian Amazon have found that Giant South American river turtles (Podocnemis expansa), or Arraus, actually use several different kinds of vocal communication to coordinate their social behaviors, including one used by female turtles to call to their newly hatched offspring in what is the first instance of recorded parental care in turtles.
“These distinctive sounds made by turtles give us unique insights into their behavior, although we don’t know what the sounds mean,” said Dr. Camila Ferrara, Aquatic Turtle Specialist for the WCS Brazil Program. “The social behaviors of these reptiles are much more complex than previously thought.”…
(read more: Wildlife Conservation Society)
photograph by © C. Ferrara/WCS

rhamphotheca:

Scientists Study “Talking” Turtles in Brazilian Amazon

via: Wildlife Conservation Society

Authors find that Giant South American river turtles have a repertoire of vocalizations for different behavioral situations, including caring for young

Turtles are well known for their longevity and protective shells, but it turns out these reptiles use sound to stick together and care for young, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations.

Scientists working in the Brazilian Amazon have found that Giant South American river turtles (Podocnemis expansa), or Arraus, actually use several different kinds of vocal communication to coordinate their social behaviors, including one used by female turtles to call to their newly hatched offspring in what is the first instance of recorded parental care in turtles.

“These distinctive sounds made by turtles give us unique insights into their behavior, although we don’t know what the sounds mean,” said Dr. Camila Ferrara, Aquatic Turtle Specialist for the WCS Brazil Program. “The social behaviors of these reptiles are much more complex than previously thought.”…

(read more: Wildlife Conservation Society)

photograph by © C. Ferrara/WCS

rhamphotheca:

Not a walkingstick… it’s an assassin bug (genus Emesaya). 
These and other members of the subfamily Emisinae are called thread-legged bugs. They are true bugs more closely related to things like stinkbugs and milkweed bugs than to walkingsticks, despite the similar appearance. 
Thread-legged bugs are predators, and their two front legs are modified for grabbing and grasping, much like those in praying mantids. They are small insects, averaging less than 1.3 in (3 cm), though some may reach twice that length. 
Some species have been observed stealing insects caught in spider webs, and even hunting the web’s owner itself. As in other assassin bugs, thread-legged bugs have a sturdy, straw-like proboscis that they puncture their prey with; they inject a lethal saliva that also liquifies the prey’s insides, and then suck it up. 
Thread-legged bugs can be found through much of the year and across most of the continental United States, into parts of southern Canada.photo by Jenn Forman Orth (urtica) on Flickr
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

rhamphotheca:

Not a walkingstick… it’s an assassin bug (genus Emesaya).

These and other members of the subfamily Emisinae are called thread-legged bugs. They are true bugs more closely related to things like stinkbugs and milkweed bugs than to walkingsticks, despite the similar appearance.

Thread-legged bugs are predators, and their two front legs are modified for grabbing and grasping, much like those in praying mantids. They are small insects, averaging less than 1.3 in (3 cm), though some may reach twice that length.

Some species have been observed stealing insects caught in spider webs, and even hunting the web’s owner itself. As in other assassin bugs, thread-legged bugs have a sturdy, straw-like proboscis that they puncture their prey with; they inject a lethal saliva that also liquifies the prey’s insides, and then suck it up.

Thread-legged bugs can be found through much of the year and across most of the continental United States, into parts of southern Canada.

photo by Jenn Forman Orth (urtica) on Flickr

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

cool-critters:

Greater Bilby (Macrotis lagotis)

The greater bilby, often referred to simply as the bilby since the lesser bilby became extinct in the 1950s, is an Australian species of nocturnal omnivorous animal in the Peramelemorphia order.

Greater bilbies live in arid areas of central Australia. Their range and population is in decline. It makes its home in a burrow that spirals down, making it hard for its predators to get in.

Greater bilbies are nocturnal omnivores that do not need to drink water, as they get all the moisture they need from their food, which includes insects and their larvae, seeds, spiders, bulbs, fruit, fungi, and very small animals. Most food is found by digging or scratching in the soil, and using their very long tongues.

Greater bilbies are generally solitary marsupials; however, there are some cases in which they travel in pairs. They are considered as “Vulnerable" by the IUCN.

photo credits: wildlifesydney, oddanimals, geeveston

(via rhamphotheca)

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Freshwater Hydroid" (Cordylophora caspia)
…a ‘unique’ species of Oceaniid hydrozoan which is native to Northern Europe, but has been introduced into the United States and Canada. True to its common name Cordylophora caspia inhabits freshwater and brackish (or sightly salty) habitats, with colonies growing on a myriad of hard surfaces like rocks, pilings, and even mussel shells. Like marine hydroids C. caspia is predatory and will consume a variety of freshwater invertebrates. 
Cordylophora caspia populations may benefit from the expansion of zebra and quagga mussels in North America, as they provide substrate. It is thought that the increase salinity in systems impacted by road salt benefit them as well. 
Classification
Animalia-Cnidaria-Hydrozoa-Hydroida-Anthomedusae-Oceaniidae-Corydlophora-C. caspia
Image: Nadine Rorem

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Freshwater Hydroid" (Cordylophora caspia)

…a ‘unique’ species of Oceaniid hydrozoan which is native to Northern Europe, but has been introduced into the United States and Canada. True to its common name Cordylophora caspia inhabits freshwater and brackish (or sightly salty) habitats, with colonies growing on a myriad of hard surfaces like rocks, pilings, and even mussel shells. Like marine hydroids C. caspia is predatory and will consume a variety of freshwater invertebrates. 

Cordylophora caspia populations may benefit from the expansion of zebra and quagga mussels in North America, as they provide substrate. It is thought that the increase salinity in systems impacted by road salt benefit them as well. 

Classification

Animalia-Cnidaria-Hydrozoa-Hydroida-Anthomedusae-Oceaniidae-Corydlophora-C. caspia

Image: Nadine Rorem

(via rhamphotheca)

myshoesuntied:

Boyhood, dir. Richard Linklater (2014)
Most of my days are spend at least half-way steeped in nostalgia. Often, I get nostalgic for a moment before it’s even finished happening. I think about growing up. I think about how my hands were once tiny & are still tiny but in a much different way. I think about how I saw my mom as the most sturdy tree, only to realize she is an entire forest the sunlight spills through. I think about how I cared for people, how they disappear, how they appear. I think about loving clumsily, and that I honestly believe the clumsiness of loving is what makes us make it from sun to moon and back again. I think about how oh my gosh all this life has happened and is happening and I am still here, in it, with others happening in it at the same time. I can’t help but be bewildered. This film stretched that bewilderment into a whole other sky, one not new, but one I haven’t learned to listen to until now. See this film. 

myshoesuntied:

Boyhood, dir. Richard Linklater (2014)

Most of my days are spend at least half-way steeped in nostalgia. Often, I get nostalgic for a moment before it’s even finished happening. I think about growing up. I think about how my hands were once tiny & are still tiny but in a much different way. I think about how I saw my mom as the most sturdy tree, only to realize she is an entire forest the sunlight spills through. I think about how I cared for people, how they disappear, how they appear. I think about loving clumsily, and that I honestly believe the clumsiness of loving is what makes us make it from sun to moon and back again. I think about how oh my gosh all this life has happened and is happening and I am still here, in it, with others happening in it at the same time. I can’t help but be bewildered. This film stretched that bewilderment into a whole other sky, one not new, but one I haven’t learned to listen to until now. 

See this film. 

rhamphotheca:

Giant Octopus Released Back Into the Wild

Velma the Pacific Giant Octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) was returned back into the wild today. The Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, OR, typically keep their octopuses 6-9 months and release them once they outgrow their tank or show signs of getting ready to reproduce. For their specimens they depend on donations from local crabbers and fishers who accidentally catch them in their pots and nets. They’re currently on the lookout for their next resident octopus.

(via: Hatfield Marine Science Center Visitor Center)

blastedheath:

Ivan Choultsé (Russian, 1874-1937), Forest landscape, 1912. Oil on canvas, 42.2 x 55 cm.

blastedheath:

Ivan Choultsé (Russian, 1874-1937), Forest landscape, 1912. Oil on canvas, 42.2 x 55 cm.