red-lipstick:

Agan Harahap (Jakarta, Indonesia) - Safari series: Sahid Jaya Hotel’s Bathroom, 2009

red-lipstick:

Agan Harahap (Jakarta, Indonesia) - Safari series: Sahid Jaya Hotel’s Bathroom, 2009

(Source: chngyaohong.com)

"Post proves that she can run with the best of them, as the book echoes those of writers like Daniel Woodrell and others that have come before her. A TREE BORN CROOKED begs you come set a while, but by the end, all you’re going to want to do is hug the neck of your loved ones and hope to Heaven that you never meet people like this."

23317952

Sam Slaughter reviews Steph Post’s A Tree Born Crooked, forthcoming from Pandamoon Publishing.

"These stories are brief but never elliptical; the past is ever present, lives are fully lived before the characters appear on the page, and Werner’s prose is precise and muscular. There are no wasted words here, and no attempts at authorial trickery."

NBTcover

Brett Beach on Ryan Werner’s If There’s Any Truth in a Northbound Train (Passenger Side Books).

kyleplatts:

I did this drawing for the Moving exhibition at Watdafac Gallery in New York. The print is for sale on my shop too isn’t it. 

kyleplatts:

I did this drawing for the Moving exhibition at Watdafac Gallery in New York. The print is for sale on my shop too isn’t it. 

(Source: fuckyeahanarchopunk, via generic-art)

"It was not long after his death in Marfa that Ambrose Bierce was killed near the village of Icamole when he and an Indian muleteer were the only ones who didn’t escape as Villa’s forces overran a party of government soldiers driving a mule train loaded with arms. This time Bierce was riding with the Federales. Both prisoners were executed by a firing squad under the orders of General Tomas Urbina. That’s what journalist James H. Wilkins asserted in his front-page article in San Francisco’s The Bulletin in March 1920. Wilkins had gone to Mexico and personally interviewed a witness who had managed to snatch a photo of a man—identified as Bierce—along with a few other personal possessions from the corpse before it was abandoned, unburied, in the desert."

In 1913, Ambrose Bierce, at the age of seventy-one, rode a horse from California to Mexico, where he planned to cover the ongoing Revolutionary War. At some point, he disappeared and died, though accounts vary as to what exactly killed him. At The Paris Review DailyForrest Gander recountsthe many deaths of the Devil’s Dictionary author, which include a public burning, death by disease and executions at the hands of Mexican soldiers. (via millionsmillions)

red-lipstick:

Kálmándy Pap Ferenc aka Kálmándy Ferenc aka Kálmándy P. Ferenc (Hungarian, b. 1950) - Les Eaux Usées (Wastewater), 1978     Photography

red-lipstick:

Kálmándy Pap Ferenc aka Kálmándy Ferenc aka Kálmándy P. Ferenc (Hungarian, b. 1950) - Les Eaux Usées (Wastewater), 1978     Photography

(Source: facebook.com)

koyamapress:

Rob Clough has written an in-depth overview of Michael DeForge’s work to date. He covers the ever prolific DeForge’s recent minicomics, collections of older work, first graphic novel, and his “real comics laboratory: individual issues of Lose” in a critical essay titled “The Search: More Comics By Michael DeForge” on his High-Low blog. 

Read the whole essay here!

Author photo by Robin Nishio!

fantagraphics:

Dash Shaw's Doctors has been optioned by Twentieth Century Fox. Producer David Goyer (Batman Begins; Man of Steel; The Dark Knight) has jumped on board to adapt Shaw’s sci-fi graphic novela into a feature film.
"I’m curious and excited to see what they do with it," says cartoonist Dash Shaw.
Doctors is centered around a machine called the Charon that can bring a dead person back to life by manipulating the memories of the recently deceased. The creator of the device, Dr. Cho, has found a way to make death into a profitable venture. When a young woman loses her mother in a tragic accident, she calls on Cho and his team to bring her mom back. But what happens if a person doesn’t want to come back? Part science-fiction thriller, part family drama, part morality play for the 21st century, Doctors packs a lot of story into 96 pages.
"From the moment I read Dash’s first draft of this book, I could picture it as a film, so this is exciting news," explains Fantagraphics Associate Publisher Eric Reynolds.
VP of Production at Fox, Matt Riley, will be overseeing the project. Further details have yet to be released.

fantagraphics:

Dash Shaw's Doctors has been optioned by Twentieth Century Fox. Producer David Goyer (Batman Begins; Man of Steel; The Dark Knight) has jumped on board to adapt Shaw’s sci-fi graphic novela into a feature film.

"I’m curious and excited to see what they do with it," says cartoonist Dash Shaw.

Doctors is centered around a machine called the Charon that can bring a dead person back to life by manipulating the memories of the recently deceased. The creator of the device, Dr. Cho, has found a way to make death into a profitable venture. When a young woman loses her mother in a tragic accident, she calls on Cho and his team to bring her mom back. But what happens if a person doesn’t want to come back? Part science-fiction thriller, part family drama, part morality play for the 21st century, Doctors packs a lot of story into 96 pages.

"From the moment I read Dash’s first draft of this book, I could picture it as a film, so this is exciting news," explains Fantagraphics Associate Publisher Eric Reynolds.

VP of Production at Fox, Matt Riley, will be overseeing the project. Further details have yet to be released.

renee-french:

Hey maniacs! Baby Bjornstrand the book is available for purchase over here : http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1927668131 and if you get yourself one, let me know and I’ll send you a real paper and ink sketch just for you! You can email me at rainydohaney at yahoo .

red-lipstick:

Michelle Blade (USA)  Artist On Tumblr   *(Info with each photo)

(Source: michelleblade)

"Purely from a reader’s standpoint, I’d like to see more of the publishing instinct of, ‘We don’t know how this is gonna go, but we’re putting it out in the world anyway.’ That’s good for readers, and it’s good for artists too, because with art, the more you allow it to feel to like it has a place, the more chances people are willing to take. I think it’s important as an artist to be continually sticking your head into all these different bags. So many of my peers, or just people in general, don’t read enough. So much of culture is interested in the ‘I’ at this point. That requires no sense of aesthetic exploration. Reality is overrated to me. Everyone spends enough time on the computer, eating, going out to bars. Why do I need to read a book about that?"

Blake Butler (via mttbll)

(Source: logger.believermag.com, via ccmpress)

blastedheath:

Francesco Clemente (Italian, b. 1952), Untitled, 1983. Pastel on paper, 48 x 66 cm.

blastedheath:

Francesco Clemente (Italian, b. 1952), Untitled, 1983. Pastel on paper, 48 x 66 cm.

blastedheath:

Alan Davie (Scottish, 1920-2014), Black Gouache, 1968. Gouache, 8¼ x 10½ in.

blastedheath:

Alan Davie (Scottish, 1920-2014), Black Gouache, 1968. Gouache, 8¼ x 10½ in.

blastedheath:

Henri Gaudier-Brzeska (French, 1891-1915), Gorilla. Pen and ink, 12 x 19.5 cm.

blastedheath:

Henri Gaudier-Brzeska (French, 1891-1915), Gorilla. Pen and ink, 12 x 19.5 cm.